Poppies: WAVE installation Southend-on-sea

Poppies:WAVE installation is one of two installations on tour around the UK in 2017 as part of the 14-18 NOW WW1 centenary art commissions.

Following on from the installation: Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red at the Tower of London in 2014, artist Paul Cummins and designer Tom Piper have now created Wave and Weeping Window. 

Shoeburyness is one of only two locations where the Poppies:WAVE installation can be viewed with a backdrop of the sea. The location was chosen as Southend-on-sea saw one of the first air-raid attacks on the UK during WW1 and Shoebury Garrison played an important role in the design and testing of artillery guns. 

Wave and Weeping Window are made up of thousands of hand made ceramic red poppies. The tour in 2017 includes Derby, Belfast, Cardiff, Hull and Plymouth.

Poppies:WAVE is at Barge Pier, Gunners Park, Shoeburyness, Southend-on-sea and will be on display from 12th April to 25th June 2017. For more information go to www.1418NOW.org.uk/poppies

Waverley Paddle Steamer Trip

For my mum’s birthday I booked a day trip on the Waverley Paddle Steamer, the last sea-going paddle steamer in the world! We left mid-afternoon from the end of Southend Pier, arriving at Tower Bridge in London just after sunset.

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Photo: © Waverley Excursions Ltd

The Waverley was built on the Clyde in Scotland and was launched in 1947. After a long career she was bought for £1 in 1975 by the Paddle Steamer Preservation Society. She now makes regular pleasure trips around the UK throughout the year, which includes trips along the Thames.

It was fascinating to see the coastline and famous landmarks from a fresh perspective.

Tilbury Docks unloading a container ship…

The Queen Elizabeth II Bridge…

A view of the Docklands skyline in the distance…

The Thames Barrier…

The Millenium Dome…

Our first glimpse of the Shard and the City skyline at sunset…

Behind us was this stunning view of Canary Wharf, all lit up…

The Thames has many twists and turns on the approach to Tower Bridge, which can be very disorientating! Around the final bend we approached Tower Bridge, which opened to enable us to pass through…

…and under…

Wow! What a view!

Thank you Waverley. Until next year…

Trip to Lisbon

During May we went for a short break to Lisbon in Portugal. I’d been there once before for work and had really wanted to go back to explore it further. We stayed in a lovely boutique hotel with views from our balcony overlooking the river.

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And as the hotel was high up, the views extended over the surrounding rooftops.

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Walking around the streets I was amazed by the beauty of the many tiled buildings and the variety of patterns…

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Even the streets were paved in pattern…

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Built on seven hills the streets of Lisbon can be extremely steep. Trams are a great way to get around the city (if you can manage to squeeze in!)

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And a visit to Lisbon is not complete (in my opinion) without a visit to Pasteis de Belem for their amazing custard tarts. The custard recipe is a well-kept secret and even the pastry makers don’t know it!

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Enjoy!

 

Summer holiday in Devon

Kingswear

We spent a few days in the beautiful town of Dartmouth in Devon.

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With lovely views across the harbour from our cottage window. The River Dart runs between Dartmouth and Kingswear and travels up the coast to Totnes and beyond.

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You can get a steam train from Kingswear to Torquay and a paddle steamer back from Totnes to Dartmouth. The journey is called the Round Robin and it was a very pleasant way to spend the day.

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Another nearby attraction is the National Trust property Coleton Fishacre. The home of Rupert D’Oyly Carte, owner of the Savoy Hotel in London. The house was built in the Arts and Crafts style, in 1926, by the architect Oswald Milne.

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The beautiful gardens are set within 24 acres with areas of wild flowers…

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…pretty gardens…

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…and the occasional garden sculpture.

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Kingsmear lighthouse beach, now closed to the public.

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View of the rocks below Dartmouth Castle.

Visit to Scotney Castle in Kent

Scotney-CastleScotney Castle is a National Trust property in Kent, which I recently went to visit with my husband. As we became members of the National Trust last year we’ve been trying to visit places whenever we can and this one was a little gem. Scotney Castle is made up of a country house, moated castle and wooded gardens.

First we took a tour around the house. This was carved over the main entrance.door-sign

One of the decorative ceilings.
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I loved the colours of these bottles.
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We then wandered down to the old castle, which is now half in ruin although you can still walk inside part of the building.
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The old castle was built in 1387 by Roger D. Ashburnham and was lived in for the next 450 years by three different families. In 1836 the new house was built by the Hussey family and the old castle was deliberately ruined to create a picturesque folly in the grounds.

The grounds and gardens were lovely, and so peaceful (if a little on the chilly side)…

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…with an old boat house in the moat…
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…a beautiful pheasant, that ran off as soon as I took the photo (camera shy)…
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…and a brilliant cat and fish feature in the fountain by the house.
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